Contact

I am a Professor of Philosophy and Cognitive Science, and currently the vice rector of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

My areas of interest include the conceptual foundations of (mainly computational) cognitive and brain sciences, history and philosophy of computing and computability, and supervenience.

I co-edited two volumes:
Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond (with Jack Copeland and Carl Posy), forthcoming with MIT Press (2013).
• Special volume on the History of Modern Computing (with Jack Copeland, Carl Posy and Parker Bright), The Rutherford Journal, 3 (2010):

Below are pdf files of some forthcoming and past articles. The published versions of some papers can be accessed through PhilPapers .

Computation, cognition, brain

• Marr's Computational-Level Theories and Delineating Phenomena (with William Bechtel). In David Kaplan (ed.) Integrating Psychology and Neuroscience: Prospects and Problems. Oxford University Press (2013).
• Putnam and Computational Functionalism. In Andrew Bailey (ed.) Key Thinkers in Philosophy of Mind. Continuum Press (2013).
• Can a Brain Possess Two Minds? Journal of Cognitive Science, 13 (2012): 145-165.
• Computation, Implementation, Cognition. Minds and Machines, 22 (2012): 137–148.
• Structural Representations and the Brain, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 63 (2012): 519-545. [PDF]
• Computation, San Diego Style, Philosophy of Science, 77 (2010): 862-874. [PDF]
• Brains as Analog-Model Computers, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 41 (2010): 271–279. [PDF]
• Marr on Computational-Level Theories, Philosophy of Science, 77 (2010): 477-500. [PDF]
• Why We View the Brain as A Computer, Synthese, 153 (2006): 393-416. [PDF]
• The Rise and Fall of Machine Functionalism, in Yemima Ben Menahem (ed.), Contemporary Philosophy in Focus: Hilary Putnam. Cambridge University Press, (2005): 220-250. [PDF]
• Content, Computation and Externalism, Mind, 110 (2001): 369-400. [PDF]
• Multiple Realization, Computation and the Taxonomy of Psychological States, Synthese, 114 (1998): 445-461.

History and philosophy of computing and computability

• Turing versus Gödel on Computability and the Mind (with Jack Copeland). In Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond. MIT Press (2013).
• Supertasks do not increase computational power, Natural Computing, 11 (2012): 51-58. [PDF]
• Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable? (with Jack Copeland), Minds and Machines, 21 (2011): 221-239. [PDF]
• Kripke's Infinity Argument, Iyyun, 57 (2008): 3-24. [PDF]
• Physical Computation: How General are Gandy's Principles for Mechanisms? (with Jack Copeland), Minds and Machines, 17 (2007): 217-231. [PDF]
• Gödel on Turing on Computability, in Adam Olszewski, Jan Wolenski and Robert Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis after 70 years. Ontos-Verlag (2006): 393-419. [PDF]
• Super-Tasks, Accelerating Turing Machines and Uncomputability, Theoretical Computer Science, 317 (2004): 105-114. [PDF]
• Physical Hypercomputation and the Church-Turing Thesis (with Itamar Pitowsky), Minds and Machines, 13 (2003): 87-101. [PDF]
• Effective Computation by Humans and Machines, Minds and Machines, 12 (2002): 221-240. [PDF]
• What is Computer Science About?, Monist, 82 (1999): 131-149.
• Two Dogmas of Computationalism, Minds and Machines, 7 (1997): 321-344.

Supervenience

• Supervenience (with Vera Hoffmann-Kolss). An entry in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Social Sciences. SAGE Publications, Inc. (2013).
• Concepts of Supervenience Revisited, Erkenntnis, (2013): 469-485. Online. [PDF]
• Supervenience and Anomalism are Compatible, Dialectica, 65 (2011): 241-266. [PDF]
• Strong Global Supervenience is Valuable, Erkenntnis, 71 (2009): 417-423. [PDF]
• Anomalism and Supervenience: A Critical Survey, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 39 (2009): 237-272. [PDF]
• Global Supervenience, Coincident Entities and Anti-Individualism, Philosophical Studies, 109 (2002): 171-195. [PDF]
• More on Global Supervenience, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 59 (1999): 691-701. [PDF]